France

One April morning in 2012, the director Bruno Romy and the artist Annabelle Cocollos are told that Mika, their 6-year-old daughter, has leukemia. Eight months later, when Mika is finally able to return to school, the family decides to make a documentary called “When I Was 6, I Killed a Dragon.” Surprisingly fun and full of life, even as it deals with illness and the fear of death, the film blends fantasy and slapstick into its lively mix and incorporates touching, playful, and sometimes fantastical footage.

When I Was 6, I Killed a Dragon

The notorious Pépé le moko (Jean Gabin, in a truly iconic performance) is a wanted man: Women long for him, rivals hope to destroy him, and the law is breathing down his neck at every turn. On the lam in the labyrinthine Casbah of Algiers, Pépé is safe from the clutches of the police — until a Parisian playgirl compels him to risk his life and leave its confines once and for all. Julien Duvivier’s “Pépé le moko” is one of the most influential films of the 20th century and a landmark of French poetic realism.

Pépé le moko

B&W, 35mm projection source (courtesy of Institut Francais)