Andrew Wyatt

Andrew Wyatt

Andrew Wyatt lives in St. Louis, Missouri, where he writes on cinema, television, video art, and culture. Andrew was the weekly film critic for St. Louis Magazine from 2010 to 2017, and still contributes to that publication. He has also been a contributor to The Curator and Temporary Art Review. For his work at St. Louis Magazine, he was named a finalist in the Blog Writing category of the 2014 Great Plains Journalism Awards. He is a member of the Online Film Critics Society and the St. Louis Film Critics Association, and serves as the webmaster for the latter organization. He has served as a juror and presenter for the St. Louis International Film Festival, the St. Louis Filmmakers Showcase, the Robert Classic French Film Festival, and the CinemaSpoke screenplay competition.

Blog: Gateway Cinephile | Twitter: @arachnophiliac | Letterboxd: awyatt76

A Still from 'Solo: A Star Wars Story'.

Review: 'Solo: A Star Wars Story'

For decades, it was an open secret among serious Star Wars fans that some of the franchise’s most imaginative and stimulating stories could be found not on the silver screen, but in the so-called Expanded Universe (EU) of novels, comics, video games, and... Read more

'Westworld': "Akane No Mai"

[Note: This post contains spoilers.]

Especially in its early scenes, “Akane No Mai” suffers from some noticeably clunky, even cringe-worthy dialogue. Characters declaim the importance of the episode’s events and revelations with the sort of tin-eared,... Read more

Review: 'Revenge'

Although it remains a somewhat contentious subgenre, the rape-revenge thriller has a rich (if not exactly respectable) pedigree, extending back to seminal exploitation features like Thriller: A Cruel Picture (1973), I Spit on Your Grave (1978),... Read more

Still from 'Westworld' Season 2, Episode 4, "The Riddle of the Sphinx"

'Westworld': "The Riddle of the Sphinx"

[Note: This post contains spoilers.]

“The Riddle of the Sphinx” is the first truly great episode of Westworld’s second season, a distinction that’s even more impressive when one considers that it’s the first time that co-showrunner Lisa... Read more

Review: 'Lu Over the Wall'

For Japanese animation aficionados whose primary point of reference is the output of Studio Ghibli, Masaaki Yuasa’s vibrant, toe-tapping fable Lu Over the Wall will come as a modest surprise. This isn’t to say that the sprightly Lu isn’t... Read more

'Westworld': "Virtù e Fortuna"

[Note: This post contains spoilers.]

After last week’s sequence of far-flung flashbacks, “Virtù e Fortuna” returns Westworld to the bifurcated “present and recent past” structure established in the season premiere. (Although it vastly... Read more

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for April 2018

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often implement a same-day launch, simultaneously premiering in a select-city theatrical run and on video-on-demand (VOD) services.... Read more

'Westworld': "Reunion"

[Note: This post contains spoilers.]

“Reunion” is a case study in how a Westworld episode can feel simultaneously revelatory and inert. It’s a flashback-heavy chapter that is almost exclusively centered on Delores (Evan Rachel Wood), which... Read more

'Westworld': "Journey Into Night"

[Note: This post contains spoilers.]

Westworld is a show with a very dim view of human nature (and, by extension, android nature). Presented with the seemingly limitless possibilities of an immersive live-action game in an evocative... Read more

Still from 'A Quiet Place'.

Review: 'A Quiet Place'

Writer-director John Krasinski’s scary-good creature feature A Quiet Place is bookended by a pair of gestures that reveal, through counter-example, just how timid and senselessly self-indulgent most popcorn features have become in the 2010s. They aren’t... Read more

Still from 'Mohawk'.

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for March 2018

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often implement a same-day launch, simultaneously premiering in a select-city theatrical run and on video-on-demand (VOD) services.... Read more

Review: 'Isle of Dogs'

One of the hidden depths to be found in DreamWorks Animation’s proudly anachronistic fantasy romp How to Train Your Dragon (2010) is an allegorical one. Angle it the right way, and Dean DeBois and Chris Sanders’ feature can be viewed a lucid metaphor for... Read more

Still from 'The Death of Stalin'.

Review: 'The Death of Stalin'

Tragedy plus time equals comedy, or so the saving goes. A handful of topics are so heinous, however, that they seem to defy this formulation. It’s now been more than eight decades since the end of World War II in Europe, and although some stand-up comedians have... Read more

Review: 'Thoroughbreds'

Olivia Cooke and Anya Taylor-Joy were born to be film actresses. Certainly, many performers of their generation can claim both sizable dramatic talent and the sort of strange, striking beauty that sets fashion photographers swooning. What make Cooke and Taylor-Joy... Read more

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for February 2018

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often implement a same-day launch, simultaneously premiering in a limited theatrical run and on video-on-demand (VOD) services. Moreover,... Read more

Review: 'Red Sparrow'

Director Francis Lawrence’s agreeably trashy cloak-and-dagger potboiler Red Sparrow feels like a throwback in several ways. Most conspicuously, it takes many of its unabashedly sleazy cues from the erotically charged dramas and thrillers that were a part... Read more

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for January 2018

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often implement a same-day launch, simultaneously premiering in a limited theatrical run and on video-on-demand (VOD) services. Moreover,... Read more

Review: 'Hostiles'

Like all the director’s features, Scott Cooper’s bleak, slow-burn Western Hostiles manages to eke out rough success, despite the familiarity of its story components. Cooper’s works are consistently constructed according to durable, masculine formulae: the... Read more

A still from 'The Final Year'.

Review: 'The Final Year'

In a time of marked polarization and hostility in American politics, the most obvious dilemma that faces Greg Barker’s new documentary feature, The Final Year, is the kneejerk partisan response of the viewer. The film provides a behind-the-scenes,... Read more

A scene from 'Phantom Thread'.

Review: 'Phantom Thread'

The opening lines in Paul Thomas Anderson’s new feature Phantom Thread are spoken by Alma (Vicky Krieps), a young British woman with an indefinite Continental slant in her accent. In hushed, carefully-chosen words, she tries to articulate—to an initially... Read more

A still from 'Desolation'

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for December 2017

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often have a ‘same-day’ limited theatrical opening and video-on-demand (VOD) launch. Moreover, streaming services are now offering original... Read more

Silence

The Best Films of 2017

Call it the La La Land hangover. In the wake of the overwhelming popularity and wide-ranging critical acclaim heaped on Damien Chazelle’s bittersweet musical fantasy in 2016, it was hard not to notice the extent to which 2017’s best feature films... Read more

The Best Streaming Horror Films of 2017

Video-on-demand (VOD) is increasingly becoming a vital way for horror enthusiasts to access the genre's best contemporary features, particularly in secondary and tertiary markets such as St. Louis. In some ways, 2017 was a watershed year, in which the horror... Read more

Every Horror Film of 2017, Ranked

In a year in which real-world political and cultural events often seemed like fodder for a surreal nightmare, horror cinema could often appear superfluous. Even dedicated aficionados of the genre could be forgiven for questioning the escapist value of ghosts,... Read more

Review: 'Call Me By Your Name'

Broadly speaking, romantic coming-of-age dramas—which are typically centered on a formative, head-over-heels relationship—often follow one of two approaches. Some films aim primarily for social and emotional realism, erecting an authentic... Read more

Review: 'The Shape of Water'

If Guillermo del Toro’s monster vs. battle-bot indulgence Pacific Rim (2013) is the film that an eight-year-old version of the director might have wanted to see, then del Toro’s latest effort, The Shape of Water, is the sort of feature that might... Read more

Review: 'The Disaster Artist'

James Franco is a bit of an enigma. Following his breakout in the television series Freaks and Geeks (1999-2000) and Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man films (2002-2007), Franco has become a ubiquitous presence as an actor: shoring up broad, bro-friendly... Read more

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for November 2017

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often have a ‘same-day’ limited theatrical opening and video-on-demand (VOD) launch. Moreover, streaming services are now offering original... Read more

Review: 'Justice League'

The conventional wisdom is that Man of Steel (2013) and Batman v. Superman (2016), the first two entries in the wannabe “DC Extended Universe”, were critical duds partly due to their unremittingly dour tone. The grim, brooding... Read more

Review: 'The Square'

Viewers who have experienced the delectable agony of director Ruben Östlund’s international breakout Force Majeure (2014) doubtlessly have some expectations regarding the Swedish filmmaker’s... Read more

Review: 'The Killing of a Sacred Deer'

The characters in Yorgos Lathimos’ films don’t talk like normal people. In the case of the Bizarro clan in the director’s pitch-black absurdist masterpiece Doogtooth (2009), the family’s speech patterns reveal their insular enforced... Read more

Review: 'Wonderstruck'

Wonderstruck is vivid case study in how things can go subtly awry when there is a mismatch between a film’s source material and its director. The feature was adapted from the 2011 illustrated novel of the same name by Brian Selznick,... Read more

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for October 2017

The cream of contemporary feature-length cinema isn’t always found in theaters. These days, smaller and more niche films often have a ‘same-day’ limited theatrical opening and video-on-demand (VOD) launch. Moreover, streaming services are now... Read more

Review: 'Thor: Ragnarok'

The Marvel Cinematic Universe has always had an irreverent side, going back to the feature that started the whole multi-media merchandising colossus, Iron Man (2008). As inhabited by Robert Downey Jr., war profiteer-turned-hero Tony... Read more

Review: 'The Florida Project'

The lyrics to Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers’ 1976 single “American Girl” contain references to the heartache and recklessness of young adulthood, but the song could easily describe the life of Moonee, the precocious 6-year-old heroine of ... Read more

Review: 'The Foreigner'

The Foreigner is a broken film, but it is broken in such an oddly narrow way that it still manages be entertaining, and even mildly invigorating within the limits of its generic formulae. The film’s fundamental flaw is that it is, in fact, two... Read more

Review: 'Marshall'

Thurgood Marshall is the sort of American legal and political titan who practically demands a biopic, but it was probably inevitable that said biopic would turn out to be such a dispiritingly middlebrow affair. The film that director Reginald Hudlin (House... Read more

Review: 'Blade Runner 2049'

Director Ridley Scott’s 1982 feature Blade Runner is the kind of epochal genre film whose stylistic influence is so enormous, it can be difficult to accurately assess the feature’s merits and flaws in isolation. Blade Runner changed science... Read more

Review: 'The Mountain Between Us'

Whether entirely fictional or inspired by true events, tales of people enduring extraordinary circumstances and coming out alive are generally viewed as fertile soil for filmmaking. All on its own, however, the simple fact of survival isn’t... Read more