Below is information regarding the 2016 St. Louis International Film Festival. The 2017 festival will take place Nov. 2-12, 2017. Submissions are now open.

Bob's Tour: Understanding What We See

Schedule

Saturday, Nov. 5 at 4:00pm

Washington University graduate Jun Bae profiles Bob Hansman, a beloved architecture professor at the school. In its portrait of a white man with a black son, the film provides an intimate look at Hansman and his insights into segregated St. Louis. The film follows Hansman as he takes his students on an unusual bus tour of our racially divided city — including Ferguson and the deliberately vanished neighborhood of Mill Creek Valley — offering an informative history of African-Americans in St. Louis. Crossing both physical boundaries and invisible structural divides within the city, the tour visits not only historically significant areas such as the notorious Pruitt-Igoe housing site but also more personal places such as Ivory Perry Park. As the tour unfolds, Hansman provides background on the historic patterns behind such ongoing problems as school inequity and housing segregation. By exploring a wide range of racial, sociocultural, and political issues in St. Louis, Hansman helps explain the sad decline of a major city that was once destined to be the capital of the United States.

Free
2016
79 min.

Directed by

Jun Bae

Country

U.S.

Film Category

Art & Architecture Spotlight Human Rights Spotlight Leon & Mary Strauss Documentary Spotlight Mean Streets: Viewing the Divided City Through the Lens of Film and Television Race in America: The Black Experience Show-Me Cinema

Subject

African American Art Class Issues Family Issues Human Rights Politics Youth
With director Bae, subjects Bob Hansman and Jovan Hansman, and scholars Heidi Kolk (Washington U. associate director of American Culture Studies) and John Early (Washington U. lecturer in 2D Design & Drawing).

Sponsored by

Center for the Humanities at Washington University and Washington University Libraries

Presented in partnership with Missouri History Museum and The Common Reader

Mean Streets is a program of The Divided City: An Urban Humanities Initiative. With the support of the Mellon Foundation, Washington U.’s Center for the Humanities, in partnership with the College of Architecture and Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Design, is engaged in a four-year initiative called The Divided City, which addresses one of the most persistent and vexing issues in urban studies: segregation.

Film Website

Official Website

Shown with

Exodus

Exodus

Jun Bae

In a neighborhood just north of the old Pruitt-Igoe housing project, residents of St. Louis Place face forced eviction for the construction of the National Geo-Spatial Intelligence Agency (NGA) facility.

2016
19 min.