Cinema for Students

Georgia Frontiere Cinema for Students Program

2018 Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival

Free Film Screenings for St. Louis-Area Students (Grades 1-12)

Sponsored by Lucia Rosenbloom and Chip Rosenbloom (in honor of Georgia Frontiere)

with support from the Jane M. & Bruce P. Robert Charitable Foundation

Busing sponsored by the Hawkins Foundation


Cinema St. Louis and the 27th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival (SLIFF) present their 15th year of Free Educational Film Programming, the Georgia Frontiere Cinema for Students (CFS) Program.

Screenings are scheduled Friday, Nov. 2, and Monday-Thursday, Nov. 5-9, at The Gathering, Plaza Frontenac Cinema, St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library, and St. Louis Science Center.

In addition to the free screenings, we are offering Free Busing. Cinema St. Louis will pay for up to $500 per school in busing costs (in special cases, we can exceed this amount; inquire when booking a program). This applies to programs at all venues. All schools are eligible, but we would ask districts and private schools whose budgets already include funding for field trips to defer, allowing schools with fewer resources to take advantage of the program. We have a $14,000 cap, so this will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis; early registration for programs is thus encouraged. See the attached form for more information.

CFS also offers In-School Presentations of 32 programs (including 16 films not available at the venues) during the time frame of Nov. 2 and Nov. 5-9.

CFS offers a diverse selection of films for grades 1-12, allowing students and educators to explore world cinema as a supplement to their current subjects of study. The films can enhance each student’s education by providing exposure to various aspects of science, history, social studies, literature, language, music, and culture. Select programs are accompanied by the filmmakers. The program also offers a film in French (“Speak Up”) and Spanish (“A Trip to the Moon”) at Plaza Frontenac.

Screenings are held at the following locations:

  • The Gathering, 2360 McCausland Ave. (near intersection with Manchester Avenue) in St. Louis
  • Plaza Frontenac Cinema, 210 Plaza Frontenac in Frontenac
  • St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library, 1301 Olive St. in downtown St. Louis
  • St. Louis Science Center, Omnimax Theatre, 5050 Oakland Ave. in Forest Park

For all in-school presentations, schools will need to be able to screen the films from a computer using a website link and password, preferably with a digital projector. If a school can only screen from DVD, a disc will be provided (except in the case of “General Magic,” which can only be screened from a website).

To make reservations or inquire about in-school presentations use the online form or contact Mallory Duncan or Brian Spath:

Cinema St. Louis
3547 Olive St.
St. Louis, MO 63103-1000


Mallory Duncan: 314-497-9084, CinemaForStudents@cinemastlouis.org

Brian Spath: 314-289-4153, brian@cinemastlouis.org

Fax: 314-289-4159

If you'd like printable forms and information, PDFs of the Cinema for Students information are available for download here.

SCREENINGS

Friday, Nov. 2

Day One

Lori Miller, 81 min., 2018, U.S., in English (with some subtitles), documentary feature

9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 2, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 6-12 (equivalent to PG)

Website for more info: Nahed Chapman New American Academy

“Day One” follows a group of teens from war zones in the Middle East and Africa as they are resettled in St. Louis and enrolled at Nahed Chapman New American Academy, a unique school in the St. Louis Public Schools system for refugees only. Traumatized on their arrival — having survived war and years in refugee camps — the kids are guided through an incredible program of healing, PTSD intervention, education, and adjustment by the school’s passionate and talented educators. The featured teens come from Somalia, Afghanistan, the Congo, Iraq, and Syria. These students and their families are faced with economic, language, psychological, and cultural challenges, sometimes dangerous living conditions, and the U.S.’s turbulent anti-immigrant political climate. Filmed over the course of a year, “Day One” follows the kids as they progress through their layers of grief and loss while attending school, forging new friendships, and preparing to be mainstreamed into “regular” public high school with the support and mentorship of their compassionate teachers and advocates.

Also available for in-school presentation (with filmmaker or a subject on select dates; inquire about availability)

With filmmaker Lori Miller and subjects


Modest Heroes

Multiple directors, 45 min., 2018, Japan, in English, animated narrative shorts
10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 2, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 1-4 (equivalent to G)

This banquet of kid-friendly short films from Japan’s Studio Ponoc (“Mary and the Witch’s Flower”) features three works about modest heroes:

  • Invisible (Akihiko Yamashita, 13 min.). This short, directed by the lead animator on “Howl’s Moving Castle” and other films by the legendary Hayao Miyazaki, follows a nameless invisible man who must try to recapture his interest in life.
  • Kanini & Kanino (Hiromasa Yonebayashi, 16 min.): The Academy Award-nominated director of “When Marnie Was There” and “Mary and the Witch’s Flower” tells the story of two tiny crab brothers who venture out into the world for the first time and encounter an array of challenges.
  • Life Ain’t Gonna Lose (Yoshiyuki Momose, 15 min.): The director, who was the key animator on such Isao Takahata films as “Grave of the Fireflies,” relates a true story about a mother and her severely egg-allergic son.

Monday, Nov. 5

The Long Shadow

Frances Causey, 88 min., 2018, U.S., in English, documentary feature

9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 6-12 (equivalent to PG)

Website for more info: The Long Shadow Study Guide

When filmmaker and investigative journalist Frances Causey, a daughter of the South, set out to explore the continuing racial divisions in the U.S., what she discovered was that the politics of slavery didn’t end with the Civil War. In an astonishingly candid look at the United States’ original sin, “The Long Shadow” traces slavery’s history from America’s founding up through its insidious ties to racism today.

Also available for in-school presentation

With filmmaker Maureen Gosling


The Big Bad Fox and Other Tales

Benjamin Renner & Patrick Imkert, 80 min., 2017, France, in English, animated narrative shorts

10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 5, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 2-5 (equivalent to G)

From the creators of the Academy Award®-nominated “Ernest & Celestine” comes another hilarious, heartwarming tale of animal misfits destined to become a classic. The countryside isn’t always as calm and peaceful as it’s made out to be, and the animals on this farm are particularly agitated: a fox who mothers a family of chicks, a rabbit who plays the stork, and a duck who wants to be Santa Claus. If you think life in the country is a walk in the park, think again! Directors Benjamin Renner and Patrick Imbert adapt Renner’s acclaimed graphic novel into a delirious, delightful triptych of interlocking stories, with a pacing and visual spontaneity that harkens back to classic Looney Tunes shorts and slapstick two-reelers. But underneath the gags (and there are plenty of them), the three stories offer a sensitive and beautiful portrayal of family and the anxieties of modern life.


Tuesday, Nov. 6

The Best of Us: 100 Years of Muny Magic

Kathy Bratkowski, 54 min., 2018, U.S., in English, documentary feature

9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 6-12 (equivalent to G)

Website for more info: The Muny

The Municipal Theatre of St. Louis, affectionately known as The Muny, has been a part of St. Louis life for generations. This summer marked the 100th season that The Muny has presented top-notch musical theater outdoors in St. Louis’ Forest Park, and “The Best of Us” pays tribute to this world-renowned institution on that significant anniversary. Featuring dozens of interviews with actors, performers, craftspeople, and audience members and providing rare glimpses backstage, the film demonstrates why The Muny is a place like no other.

Also available for in-school presentation (with filmmaker and/or a Muny representative on select dates; inquire about availability)

With filmmaker Kathy Bratkowski and a Muny representative


SLIFF/Kids Shorts

Multiple directors, 74 min., multiple countries, in English or with no or minimal dialogue, animated and live-action narrative shorts

10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 2-5 (equivalent to G)

An enlightening and entertaining selection of age-appropriate shorts from the 2017 St. Louis International Film Festival.

  • Coin Operated (Nicholas Arioli, 6 min., 2017, U.S.): Becoming an explorer takes time — and money.
  • Commander (Joel Dunn, 2 min., 2017, U.S.): A precocious girl dreams of becoming a space commander by walking in the footsteps of her hero.
  • Corky (Ty Primosch, 6 min., 2017, U.S.): A corkscrew battles a giant glass bottle to uncork seven mysterious lightning bugs.
  • Dam! The Story of Kit the Beaver (Kjell Boersma, 12 min., 2017, Canada): Kit, a highly independent and easily distracted young beaver, loves to explore the sounds of her forest.
  • Indice 50 (Sylvain Amblard, Alexandre Belmudes, Damien Clef, Mégane Fumel, Joseph Guené & Mathieu Peters-Houg, 6 min., 2016, France, minimal dialogue in French with English subtitles): A family arrives on a crowded beach to spend their holidays, but a mosquito transforms their wonderful day.
  • Injured (Mohamad Hosein Abedini, 7 min., 2016, Iran, minimal dialogue in Persian with English subtitles): A little girl tries to find out the secret of the truck that is parked in front of her family’s house.
  • Karma (Peter Zhaoyu Zhou, 4 min., 2017, U.S.): A boy meets a fish in a mysterious forest.
  • The Owl and the Lemming (Roselynn Akulukjuk, 4 min., 2016, Canada): In this instructive Inuit folktale, a young owl catches a lemming to eat.
  • Rouff (Benjamin Brand, Johannes Engelhardt, Markus Eschrich, Johannes Lumer & Julius Rosen, 7 min., 2017, Germany): Three-legged dog Rouff is lonely, but he creates a new friend by folding some paper.
  • Scribble (Margaret Orr, 2 min., 2016, U.S., in English & minimal dialogue in Spanish with English subtitles): A film animated by first-graders at a Chicago public school.
  • Frogs’ Song (Violaine Pasquet, 11 min., 2016, France): In Louisiana, when everybody is falling asleep, a frog has started singing in the depths of the bayou.
  • Swiff (Alexis Agliata, Juliana Berckmans, Arnaud Bellour, Théo Bonora, Thiaud Gambier & Romain Lavoine, 7 min., 2016, France): When an alien spaceship crashes on Earth, the pilot is disturbed by a hyperactive little boy as he looks for fuel.

Also available for in-school presentation


Science Fair

Cristina Costantini & Darren Foster, 90 min., 2018, Brazil/Germany/U.S., in English, German & Portuguese with English subtitles

10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, St. Louis Science Center

Appropriate for grades 6-12 (rated PG for some thematic elements and brief language)

Website for more info: ISEF and St. Louis Science Fair

Every year, more than 1,700 students from 75 countries compete in the annual International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF), a highly competitive showcase of the world’s top young scientific minds. Selected from millions of students who qualified through sanctioned events to reach the international competition, these finalists are competing for the coveted top prize that, as one previous winner explains, “will change your life in ways you won’t even comprehend.” “Science Fair” follows one mentor and nine students from around the world as they prepare their projects and teams for the 2017 ISEF event in Los Angeles.

With Peggy James Nacke, Fair Director, Academy of Science-St. Louis Science Fair


A Trip to the Moon

Joaquín Cambre, 87 min., 2017, Argentina, in Spanish with English subtitles, narrative feature

Noon Tuesday, Nov. 6, Plaza Frontenac

Appropriate for grades 9-12 (equivalent to PG-13; sexual situations and some strong language)

Tomas is an introverted teenager whose overbearing mother nags him about taking his anti-psychotic meds and studying for an upcoming important exam. If that weren’t stressful enough, Tomas is also haunted by a violent and painful childhood memory, which causes him deep distress. To cope, he learns everything he can about the moon, and he dreams of one day visiting the luminous satellite. When Tomas rebels and stops taking his pills, this escapist daydream becomes a full-blown fascination that overtakes his life — and threatens to upend his family’s stability. Can his sassy neighbor Iris, whose kindness coaxes him out of his shell, bring him back down to Earth? “A Trip to the Moon” uses well-placed moments of magical realism to illustrate how Tomas attempts to wrest control over his mental anguish. But the film is also a realistic, sympathetic portrayal of the disconnection and confusion all adolescents face as they navigate burgeoning adulthood.


Wednesday, Nov. 7

General Magic

Sarah Kerruish & Matthew Maude, 94 min., 2018, U.S./U.K., in English, documentary feature

9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 6, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 9-12 (equivalent to PG-13; some strong language)

Website for more info: General Magic

The side of Silicon Valley you never see, “General Magic” is a tale of how great vision and epic failure can change the world. Spun out from Apple in 1990 to create the “next big thing,” General Magic shipped the first handheld wireless personal communicator in 1994. From the first smartphones to social media, e-commerce, and even emoji, the ideas that now dominate the tech industry and our day-to-day lives were born at General Magic. But this was before the Web, before 3G, before Google, before everyone had a mobile phone in their pocket. The world was not ready in 1994 to hold the world in its hands, and General Magic died, but those concepts and the people who pioneered them went on to change almost everything. Combining rare archival footage with contemporary stories of the Magicians today, “General Magic” tracks the progress of anytime, anywhere communication from a thing of sci-fi fiction in 1994 to a reality in our pockets and on our wrists today. With members of the original Mac team and the creators of the iPhone, Android, eBay, and many more, this is the story of one of history’s most talented teams and what happens when those who dream big fail, fail again, fail better, and ultimately succeed.

Also available for in-school presentation


Revolting Rhymes

Jane Lachauer & Jakob Schuh, 58 min., 2016, U.K., in English, animated narrative shorts

10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 2-5 (equivalent to G)

Based on the much-loved children’s book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, “Revolting Rhymes” takes the classic fairy tales of Little Red Riding Hood, Snow White, The Three Little Pigs, Jack & the Beanstalk and Cinderella, mixes them together, and serves them with a mischievous twist. The first film sees young Snow White and Red Riding Hood become lifelong friends as Snow White takes on the might of the wicked Queen, while Red is called home to deal with a pair of hungry wolves — one who’s eaten her grandma and then dressed in her clothes, while the other can’t stop himself from eating some unsuspecting pigs. In the second film, Jack grows up with his heart set on next-door neighbor Cindy. She has her eye turned by the eligible Prince at the ball, and Jack gets distracted by a giant beanstalk at the bottom of his garden. Will they find true love? Overarching both films, the narrator — a big bad wolf — has both all the answers and a story of his own to tell.


Speak Up (A voix haute: La force de la parole)

Stéphane de Freitas & Ladj Ly, 99 min., 2017, France, in French with English subtitles, documentary feature

Noon Wednesday, Nov. 7, Plaza Frontenac

Appropriate for grades 10-12 (equivalent to PG-13; includes strong language)

Website for more info: Eloquentia Saint-Denis (in French)

Every year, hundreds of students from all over Seine-Saint-Denis face off in Eloquentia, a contest to crown the best orator in this wildly diverse, sprawling suburb of Paris. “Speak Up” follows a group of college students preparing for Eloquentia through an intensive six weeks of workshops in classical rhetoric, acting, slam poetry, and breathing techniques, then into the tournament itself. Smoothly juxtaposing fly-on-the-wall scenes of the group in the classroom and the amphitheater with interviews and solo scenes with a few participants (and the future winner!), directors de Freitas and Ly create an inspiring portrait — by turns riotous and poignant — of a young generation of every creed and color brought together by a shared commitment to the French art of rhetoric. The viewer will not soon forget Elhadj, a formerly homeless young man now running an NGO in West Africa; Leïla, a shy Syrian-French woman who forces herself to become an orator to “redefine feminism”; or Eddy, a fledgling actor from a tiny village who has to walk 10 kilometers every day to catch a train to class.


Thursday, Nov. 8

Black Voices Shorts

Multiple directors, 50 min., U.S., in English, documentary shorts

9 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 9-12 (equivalent to PG; some language)

This selection of documentary shorts by filmmakers with St. Louis or Missouri roots addresses issues related the black experience.

  • #TheSocialMovement(STL Artworks Teen Apprentices/Digital Squad, 2018, 15 min.): This inspirational story shines a bright light on five artists who are making an impact in the St. Louis community.
  • Baby Brother (Kamal Bilal, 2018, 14 min.): The director's brother moves back in with their parents.
  • For a Better Life(Yasmin Mistry, 2018, 10 min.): Sold for $100 at the age of 5, Fekri suffers through years of abuse before his plight is discovered and he’s moved into a group home where he finds support and mentorship.
  • The Kinloch Doc(Alana Marie, 2018, 4 min.): A chronicle of the rise and demise of Kinloch, Missouri's first black city.
  • The Mountains That Made Me(Sharee Silerio, 2018, 4 min.): A young woman transforms her life’s struggles and tragedies into opportunities to help other hurting women heal.
  • The Wave(Christopher Hill & Sean Loftin, 2018, 3 min.): Brother Lewis stands on the corner of Tower Grove and Vista every day, waving at people as they pass by.

Also available for in-school presentation (with a filmmaker and/or subject on select dates; inquire about availability)

With a filmmaker and/or subject


Weston Woods Shorts

Multiple directors, 77 min., U.S., in English, animated narrative shorts

10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 1-4 (equivalent to G)

Weston Woods, a division of Scholastic Books, offers award-winning animated adaptations of the world’s best children’s books.

  • Blackout (Paul Gagne, Melissa Reilly & David Trexler, 7 min., 2013): A young boy and his family break away from their usual distractions during the New York City blackout. Based on the Caldecott Honor book by John Rocco.
  • The Curious Garden (Paul Gagne, Melissa Reilly & David Trexler, 10 min., 2011): On a quest for a greener world, a young boy discovers a struggling garden and decides to take care of it. Based on the book by Peter Brown.
  • Doctor De Soto (Michael Sporn, 10 min., 1984): A mouse dentist finds a way to help a fox with a toothache without getting eaten. Based on the book by William Steig.
  • The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (Michael Sporn, 10 min., 2005): The story of Philippe Petit’s walk between the Twin Towers in 1974. Based on the Caldecott Honor book by Modicai Gerstein.
  • Me … Jane (Paul & Sandra Fierlinger, 9 min., 2015): A biography of pioneering primatologist Jane Goodall. Based on the Caldecott Honor book by Patrick McDonnell.
  • One Cool Friend (Gary McGivney, 14 min., 2015): In this endearing adventure, a boy decides a penguin would make a fantastic pet. Based on the Caldecott Honor book written by Tony Buzzeo and illustrated by David Small.
  • Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Cosmos (Paul Gagne & Melissa Reilly, 10 min., 2016): For every child who has ever looked up at the stars and asked “What are they?” comes the story of a curious boy who never stopped wondering: astronomer Carl Sagan. Based on the book by Stephanie Roth Sisson.
  • Where the Wild Things Are (Gene Deitch, 7 min., 1975): A boy named Max imagines he is where the wild things are. Based on the classic picture book by Maurice Sendak.

Also available for in-school presentation


Zoo

Colin McIvor, 96 min., 2018, U.K./Ireland, in English, narrative feature

Noon Thursday, Nov. 8, Plaza Frontenac

Appropriate for grades 4-8 (rated PG for thematic elements, some war action and language)

In 1941, marksmen from the Royal Ulster Constabulary, following a directive from the Ministry of Public Security, shot dead 23 animals at Belfast Zoo. They destroyed one hyena, six wolves, one puma, one tiger, one black bear, one Barbary lion, two polar bears, one lynx, and giant rat named Hugo. During these turbulent times, a woman secretly walked a young elephant from the zoo each evening to the backyard of her terraced home. There, she cared for and comforted it as the Luftwaffe bombs rained down over Belfast. That true story is the inspiration for “Zoo.” Seen through the eyes of 10-year-old Tom (Art Parkinson), aided and abetted by his misfit friends, this moving adventure unfolds as Tom takes on the fight to save Buster the elephant.


Friday, Nov. 9

Personal Statement

Juliane Dressner & Edwin Martinez, 87 min., 2018, U.S., in English (some Spanish with English subtitles), documentary feature

9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 9, The Gathering

Appropriate for grades 9-12 (equivalent to PG; some strong language)

Website for more info: Personal Statement

Karoline, Christine, and Enoch are Brooklyn high-school students who are determined to get their entire senior class to college, even though they aren't sure they’re going to make it there themselves. “Personal Statement” follows this inspirational trio through their senior year as they work tirelessly as peer counselors, offering the only support many of their friends have in navigating the daunting college-application process. As they work to realize better futures for themselves and their fellow students, the three students struggle and stumble, but they refuse to succumb to the sobering barriers that prevent so many low-income students from going to and graduating from college. “Personal Statement” illustrates the power that already exists within historically marginalized communities to address problems of inequality.

Also available for in-school presentation (with filmmaker and subject on afternoon of Nov. 9; inquire about availability)

With filmmaker Juliane Dressner and subject Karoline Jimenez


Robert Campbell, Mountain Man

Michael Beattie, 59 min., 2018, U.K., in English, documentary feature

10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 9, St. Louis Public Library

Appropriate for grades 6-12 (equivalent to G)

Website for more info: Campbell House Museum

The film relates the rags-to-riches tale of famous St. Louisan Robert Campbell (1804-79), a penniless Northern Ireland man who ultimately became the wealthiest man in Missouri. After arriving in St. Louis, Campbell became involved in the Rocky Mountain fur trade alongside legendary mountain men Robert Sublette and Jim Bridger, leading what he called a “bold and dashing life” — alternately fighting and befriending Native Americans, enduring the harshest of climates, suffering near starvation. Leaving the mountains, he became one of the leading citizens of St. Louis, with a business empire covering every aspect of commerce, property, and river trade. He even gave Mark Twain his first job as a Missouri riverboat pilot. The film follows Campbell's great-great-great-great nephew — former tank commander and Northern Ireland politician Alan McFarland — as he travels across the American West to uncover his ancestor’s life. Using re-enactments, archival photos, narration, and contemporary interviews, the film tells an engrossing story of adventure, love, and tragedy. The owner of the grand Campbell House — now a museum in downtown St. Louis — Campbell is buried with his family in Bellefontaine Cemetery.

Also available for in-school presentation (with Campbell House executive director on select dates; inquire about availability)

With Andrew H. Hahn, executive director of Campbell House


IN-SCHOOL PRESENTATIONS

The following films in English unless otherwise noted are available as in-school presentations on Nov. 2 and from Nov. 5-9:

  • #TheSocialMovement (STL Artworks Teen Apprentices/Digital Squad, 15 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): This inspirational story shines a bright light on five artists who are making an impact in our community. The short is a part of the multi-film Black Voices Shorts program, which is also available for in-school presentation. Depending on the date requested, a filmmaker or subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • 9at38 (Catherine K. Lee, 18 min., 2018, S. Korea/U.S., in Korean with English subtitles, documentary short): A Juilliard-trained violinist attempts to realize his dream of the last seven years: a joint concert by North and South Korean musicians, who will straddle the 38th parallel, the uncrossable border that is said to be the most militarized in the world. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Ashlock (Elliott Geolat, 15 min., 2018, U.S., narrative short): Based on a true story of a troubled marriage, this narrative dance film is set in the Old Lead Belt of Missouri. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker/choreographer may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • The Best of Us: 100 Seasons of Muny Magic: See description under Nov. 6. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker or a subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Black Voices Shorts: See description under Nov. 8. Depending on the date requested, a filmmaker or subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (some strong language)
  • Brooks People (Shahari Moore, 22 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): An exploration of the life, legacy, and impact of poet Gwendolyn Brooks, the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Crowning Change: The Erin O’Flaherty Story (Alexis Kadey, 17 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): The film traces former St. Louis-area resident Erin O’Flaherty’s triumphant journey after receiving backlash for being the first openly gay Miss America contestant. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Day One: See description under Nov. 2. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker or a subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Dirty Laundry: The Asbestos Documentary (Conor B. Lewis, 74 min., 2018, U.S., documentary feature): Two cousins from the St. Louis area journey across the U.S. by bicycle, fueled by curiosity about their grandmother’s sudden passing from mesothelioma, a rare cancer. The apparent source of the cancer: asbestos on the clothes of her husband, who worked at Shell Oil’s Wood River Refinery in the Metro East’s Roxana, Ill. Through interviews and research, the cousins uncover a trail of broken families bound by the common thread of asbestos exposure. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker or subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Website for more info: Dirty Laundry. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (equivalent to PG-13; some strong language)
  • Families Belong Together: The Crystal City (Kenya Gillespie, 13 min., 2018, U.S.): From 1942-48, in the remote desert town of Crystal City, Texas, the U.S. government operated a little-known World War II internment camp, which held Japanese, German, and Italian families from the U.S. and Latin America; and DACAmented (St. Clair Detrick-Jules, 18 min., 2018, U.S.): Profiles of nine Dreamers — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) recipients from Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, El Salvador, Ecuador, Zambia, South Korea, and Trinidad & Tobago. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Fix and Release (Scott Dobson, 16 min., 2018, Canada, documentary short): A look at the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre, a small turtle trauma center in Peterborough, Ontario, as it fights to even the odds for survival that freshwater turtles face in a modern world. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Flags of Valor (Lou Cariffe, 28 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): A look at a St. Louis event in Forest Park honoring soldiers who lost their lives in the war on terror between Sept. 11, 2001, and Sept. 11, 2016. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • General Magic: See description under Nov. 7. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (some strong language)
  • A Girl Named C (Emily Kassie, 70 min., 2018, Canada/U.S., documentary feature): “A Girl Named C” addresses one of the most pervasive and taboo subjects in the United States — child sexual assault. One in three girls before the age of 18 is sexually assaulted in America, and experts estimate up to 50 percent of their perpetrators are other children. “A Girl Named C” serves as a unique addition to the dialogue by offering a path into the mind of a survivor of assault. As with so many cases of child sexual assault, there is only circumstantial evidence of what happened to C when she was sexually assaulted by a classmate — a boy on whom she had a crush — at age 11. The film exposes a tragically ubiquitous experience, examining an epidemic facing the youngest members of society and showing the process of healing through a child’s eyes. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (frank discussions of sexual assault and its traumatic effect)
  • The Issue of Mr. O’Dell (Rami Katz, 36 min., 2018, U.S./Canada, documentary short): A biography of Jack O’Dell, a 94-year-old African-American civil-rights activist who was the director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and a colleague of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • Like Dolls, I’ll Rise (Nora Philippe, 29 min., 2018, France/U.S., documentary short): Combining images of 200 one-of-a-kind black dolls and words by famous women such as Sojourner Truth and Maya Angelou, the film tells the stories of black women from America’s enslaved and segregated past. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (some disturbing descriptions and images)
  • The Long Shadow: See description under Nov. 5. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • The Man Behind the Merferds (Joshua Herum, 35 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): Phil Berwick, a street artist in St. Louis, uses his paintings of Merferd — a bearded character he has been drawing for four decades — to carry a message of peace, hope, and love to some of the bleakest areas of the city. Depending on the date requested, the filmmaker or subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (some strong language)
  • Mr. Connolly Has ALS (Dan Habib, 32 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): Embraced by his community, a high-school principal continues to lead the school, despite rapidly losing his ability to walk and speak due to the debilitating effects of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • My Happy Complicated Family (Tessa Louise Pope, 17 min., 2017, Netherlands, in Dutch with English subtitles, documentary short): Profiles of three young girls of different ages who all have one thing in common: an exceptional family construction. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Personal Statement: See description under Nov. 9. On the afternoon of Nov. 9, the filmmaker and a subject may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12 (some strong language)
  • Return: Native American Women Reclaim Foodways for Health & Spirit (Karen Cantor, 28 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): Troubled by unhealthy diets of Native Americans, New Mexican Puebloan Roxanne Swentzell encourages her community to eat foods from before contact with Western civilization, and Native women across the continent are reclaiming traditional foodways. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Robert Campbell, Mountain Man: See description under Nov. 9. Depending on the date requested, the executive director of the Campbell House Museum may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12
  • Santuario (Christine Delp & Pilar R. Timpane, 25 min., 2018, U.S., documentary short): After more than two decades in the United States, Juana received an order of deportation, but rather than leave her four children and two 9-year-old granddaughters to return to Guatemala, she entered sanctuary at St. Barnabas Episcopal in Greensboro, N.C. Appropriate for grades 9-12
  • SLIFF/Kids Shorts: See description under Nov. 6. Appropriate for grades 2-5
  • Weston Woods Shorts: See description under Nov. 8. Appropriate for grades 1-4