Cinema for Students

Georgia Frontiere Cinema for Students Program

Free Film Screenings for St. Louis-Area Students (Grades 1-12)

Sponsored by Lucia Rosenbloom and Chip Rosenbloom
(in honor of Georgia Frontiere)
With support from the Albrecht Family Foundation
Busing sponsored by the Nancy & Ken Kranzberg
 
with support from the Jane M. & Bruce P. Robert Charitable Foundation
and Ward & Carol Klein

“Movies can and do have a tremendous influence in shaping young lives.”
– Walt Disney

2016 Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival

Cinema St. Louis and the 25th Annual Whitaker St. Louis International Film Festival (SLIFF) present their 13th year of Free Educational Film Programming, the Georgia Frontiere Cinema for Students (CFS) Program.

Screenings are scheduled Friday, Nov. 4, and Monday-Thursday, Nov. 7-10, at the Missouri History Museum, St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library, St. Louis University’s Center for Global Citizenship, and Plaza Frontenac Cinema.

In addition to the free screenings, we are offering Free Busing. Cinema St. Louis will pay for up to $400 per school in busing costs (in special cases, we can exceed this amount; inquire when booking a program). This applies to programs at all venues. All schools are eligible, but we would ask districts and private schools whose budgets already include funding for field trips to defer, allowing schools with fewer resources to take advantage of the program. We have a $8,500 cap, so this will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis; early registration for programs is thus encouraged. See the attached form for more information.

CFS also offers In-School Presentations of 14 programs (including 10 films not available at the venues) during the time frame of Nov. 7-11.

CFS offers a diverse selection of films for grades 1-12, allowing students and educators to explore world cinema as a supplement to their current subjects of study. The films can enhance each student’s education by providing exposure to various aspects of science, history, social studies, literature, language, music, theater, and culture. Select programs are accompanied by the filmmakers.

CFS is again featuring adaptations of works of fiction and other films related to literature at the St. Louis Public Library. The program also offers two films in French (“Adama” and “Belle and Sebastian: The Adventure Continues”) and a film in Spanish (“Carol’s Journey”).

• Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd. (at DeBaliviere Avenue), Forest Park in St. Louis
• Plaza Frontenac Cinema, 210 Plaza Frontenac in Frontenac
• St. Louis Public Library’s Central Library, 1301 Olive St. in downtown St. Louis
• St. Louis University’s Center for Global Citizenship, 3672 W. Pine Mall in midtown St. Louis

To make reservations or inquire about in-school presentations, fill out the online forms below or contact Tommy Callahan or Brian Spath:

Tommy Callahan: 314-594-7595
CinemaForStudents@cinemastlouis.org

Brian Spath: 314-289-4153
Fax: 314-289-4159

Cinema St. Louis
3547 Olive St.
St. Louis, MO 63103-1000

Friday, Nov. 4

Adama
Sold Out

Simon Rouby, 82 min., France, in French with English subtitles, animated narrative
9 a.m. Friday, Nov. 4, Missouri History Museum
Appropriate for grades 6-12

As 12-year-old Adama is about to experience his boyhood rite of passage, he and his brother’s lives are changed forever. Adama lives in a remote African village, but his older teenage brother Samba gets lured outside of their community to join the ranks of the Tirailleurs, French West African soldiers recruited by the French during World War I. Despite all odds, Adama goes on a journey and finds his brother at the ferocious Battle of Verdun on the Western Front. This stunningly animated coming-of-age story is an inspiring depiction of perseverance and personal striving in which fraternal bonds triumph.

King of the Hill

Steven Soderbergh, U.S., 1993, 103 min., in English, live-action narrative
10 a.m. Friday, Nov. 4, St. Louis Public Library
Appropriate for grades 9-12 (rated PG-13)

This touching, evocative period piece is faithfully adapted from native St. Louisan A.E. Hotchner’s memoir and was entirely shot in St. Louis. Set during the Great Depression, “King of the Hill” is a small jewel of a growing-up story that follows the daily struggles of a resourceful and imaginative adolescent who, after his younger brother is sent to live with a relative and his tubercular mother to a sanitarium, must survive on his own in a rundown St. Louis hotel during his salesman father’s long business trips.

Monday, Nov. 7

Olympic Pride, American Prejudice

Deborah Riley Draper, U.S., 2016, 80 min., in English, documentary
9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 7, Missouri History Museum
Appropriate for grades 6-12
Website for more info: Olympic Pride, American Prejudice

In 1936, 18 African-American athletes — dubbed the “black auxiliary” by Hitler — participated in the Berlin Olympic Games, defying Nazi Aryan supremacy and Jim Crow racism. Despite their achievements, history forgot all except one, Jesse Owens. This is the story of the other 17. Their heroic collective action created a seminal moment in civil rights. The film follows the athletes from the attempted boycott of the 1936 Olympics to the Trials to the Games and then to the unceremonious return to America.
With filmmakers Deborah Riley Draper and Michael A. Draper.

Gentlemen of Vision

Jim Kircherr & Frank Popper, U.S., 2016, 56 min., in English, documentary
9 a.m. Monday, Nov. 7, St. Louis U.’s Center for Global Citizenship
Appropriate for grades 6-12
Website for more info: Gentlemen of Vision

In the world of competitive stepping, they are the team to beat. Offstage, St. Louis’ Gentlemen of Vision are growing up in struggling working-class suburbs. Ferguson is their backyard and their reality. Gentlemen of Vision founder Marlon Wharton has built the team’s winning tradition by acting as both stepping coach and life coach. He demands from them time, discipline, good grades, and a clear plan for a future after graduation.

Also available for in-school presentation (with guest on select dates; inquire about availability)

With filmmakers Jim Kircherr and Frank Popper.

Coming Through the Rye

James Sandwith, U.S., 2016, 97 min., in English, live-action narrative
10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 7, St. Louis Public Library
Appropriate for grades 9-12 (strong language; PG-13 equivalent)
Website for more info: Coming Through the Rye

Inspired by events from the filmmaker’s own life, “Coming Through the Rye” is the poignant and funny story of 16-year-old Jamie Schwartz (Alex Wolff), who in 1969 has landed at an all-boys boarding school for all the wrong reasons. Ostracized by nearly everyone, he clings to the unshakable belief that he will someday play Holden Caulfield — the main character in “The Catcher in the Rye — on Broadway and in the movies. Jamie adapts the novel into a play to put on at school, but after a series of increasingly hostile incidents with students, he runs away with a quirky townie, DeeDee (Stefania Owen), to find the book’s author, J.D. Salinger (Chris Cooper). On their odyssey to find the reclusive writer, Jamie slowly opens up to DeeDee and discovers secrets about himself that will change his life forever.

Tuesday, Nov. 8

Bob’s Tour

Jun Bae, U.S., 2016, approx. 80 min., in English, documentary
9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, Missouri History Museum
Appropriate for grades 9-12

Washington University graduate Jun Bae provides a portrait of Bob Hansman, a beloved architecture professor at the school. The film follows Hansman as he takes his students on an unusual bus tour of our racially divided city — including Ferguson, the former site of Pruitt-Igoe, and the vanished neighborhood of Mill Creek Valley — offering an informative history of African-Americans in St. Louis and an intimate look at the man and his beliefs about race and our city.

Also available for in-school presentation (with guest on select dates; inquire about availability)

With director Jun Bae.

She Started It

Nora Poggi, U.S./France/Vietnam, 2016, 90 min., in English, French & Vietnamese with English subtitles, documentary
9 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, St. Louis U.’s Center for Global Citizenship<
Appropriate for grades 9-12
Website for more info: She Started It

Following five women over two years as they pitch venture capitalists, build teams, bring products to market, fail, and start again, “She Started It” takes viewers on a global roller-coaster ride from San Francisco to Mississippi, from France to Vietnam. Along the way, it weaves in big-picture perspectives from women such as investor Joanne Wilson; White House CTO Megan Smith; GoldieBlox CEO Debbie Sterling; and Ruchi Sanghvi, the first female engineer at Facebook. Through intimate, action-driven storytelling, “She Started It” explores the cultural roots of female underrepresentation in entrepreneurship, including pervasive self-doubt, fear of failure, and risk aversion among young women.

Also available for in-school presentation

Heidi

Alain Gsponer, 2015, Switzerland/Germany, 111 min., dubbed in English, live-action narrative
10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 8, St. Louis Public Library
Appropriate for grades 1-6

A new adaptation of the beloved children’s books by Johanna Spyri, “Heidi” is set in 19th-century Switzerland. Five-year-old orphan Heidi is sent to live with her grumpy grandfather (Bruno Ganz) high in the Alps. As Heidi grows accustomed to her new surroundings, she and her grandfather develop a strong, inseparable bond. When Heidi's stern aunt then forces her to move to Frankfurt, the young girl dreams of a way to return to her beloved Alpine home.

Belle and Sebastian: The Adventure Continues

Christian Duguay, France, 2015, 97 min., in French with English subtitles, live-action narrative
Noon Tuesday, Nov. 8, Plaza Frontenac
Appropriate for grades 3-8

The sequel to the crowd-pleasing “Belle and Sebastian” — no knowledge of its predecessor is required — “The Adventure Continues” takes place in the French Alps. Sebastian and his best friend, the dog Belle, are on a mission to find Angelina, whose plane crash-landed on her return from the battlefields of World War II. Their bravery is in full force as they partner with a mysterious pilot and a gutsy new kid to take on the countless dangers, obstacles, and secrets they encounter in the expansive terrain.

Wednesday, Nov. 9

Show Me Democracy

Dan Parris, U.S., 2016, approx. 90 min., in English, documentary
9 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, Missouri History Museum
Appropriate for grades 6-12

“Show Me Democracy” asks: Can a small group of young people make a difference in complex and imperfect systems? Following the advocacy and activist efforts of seven college students in the aftermath of events in Ferguson, the documentary chronicles their thoughts on police brutality and failing school systems, their interactions in a policy internship program, and their visit to the state capitol to advocate for the educational reforms needed to improve postsecondary educational access for those who have been disenfrancised by their race, undocumented status, or limited resources. The film traces the parallel journey of a student who leaves the team to take a leadership role in protests on the streets of Ferguson.

Warning: Some strong language

Also available for in-school presentation (with guest on select dates; inquire about availability)

With director Dan Parris.

Sounder

Martin Ritt, U.S., 1972, 105 min., in English, live-action narrative
10 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, St. Louis Public Library
Appropriate for grades 6-12 (rated G)

Based on the 1970 Newbery Medal-winning novel by William H. Armstrong, “Sounder” recounts the struggles of the Morgans, a loving and strong family of African-American sharecroppers in Louisiana in the midst of the Great Depression. The Morgans face a crisis when the father (Paul Winfield) is convicted of a petty crime — for taking food to feed his needy family — and sent to a prison camp. The mother (Cicely Tyson) eventually sends her 11-year-old son (Kevin Hooks) to visit his father at the camp, and the trip becomes an eventful odyssey. Nominated for four Oscars — including Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Adapted Screenplay — “Sounder” offers sympathetic, accessible insight into African-Americans’ history and experience.

Carol’s Journey

Imanol Uribe, Spain, 2002, 100 min., in Spanish with English subtitles, live-action narrative
Noon Wednesday, Nov. 9, Plaza Frontenac
Appropriate for grades 9-12 (strong language, PG-13 equivalent)
Website for more info: Carol’s Journey

Carol, a 12-year-old Spanish-American girl from New York, travels with her mother to Spain in the spring of 1938, at the height of the Spanish Civil War. Separated from her beloved father, Carol arrives in her mother's home village and transforms the secretive family environment. Her innocence and rebellious nature drive her at first to reject a world that is at once new and foreign, but she soon journeys into adulthood through a friendship with Maruja, the village teacher, and a young local boy, Tomiche. However, as conditions in the village deteriorate, her eyes are opened to a shocking new world of excitement, intrigue, and danger.

Thursday, Nov. 10

Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise

Rita Coburn Whack & Bob Hercules, U.S., 2016, 114 min., in English, documentary
9 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, Missouri History Museum
Appropriate for grades 9-12

“Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise” is the first feature documentary about the world-renowned writer, performer, and activist. This richly textured film provides a comprehensive look at Angelou’s life and work, including her St. Louis roots, her years in Ghana during the decolonization of Africa, her involvement in the civil-rights movement, and her tenure as one of America’s most influential voices. Although Angelou first came to literary prominence with her international best-seller “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” her importance extended well beyond the literary world, and her roles as writer, educator, and television personality made her an icon for advocates of gender and racial equality. Her art and life were always intertwined with her politics, as evidenced by her close ties to civil-rights leaders Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, and her friendship with fellow uncompromising author James Baldwin. The film includes tributes to Angelou from such important figures as Oprah Winfrey, Quincy Jones, and Bill and Hillary Clinton.

Piglet’s Big Movie
Few Seats Remain

Francis Glebas, U.S., 2003, 89 min., animated narrative
10 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, St. Louis Public Libary
Appropriate for grades 1-4 (rated G)

Disney’s “Piglet’s Big Movie” continues the adventures of the characters created by A.A. Milne in his classic Winnie-the-Pooh books. Once upon a golden day in The Hundred Acre Wood, Pooh and his friends set out to harvest honey. But when Piglet is told he’s too small to join in the fun, he decides to run away. As Pooh, Tigger, Eeyore, and the others set out to bring him home, a series of misadventures teaches them all the meaning of friendship and that even someone little can do big things. This delightful gem — written by native St. Louisan Brian Hohlfeld — is full of laughter and features five new songs.

With screenwriter Brian Hohlfeld.

 

The following films – in English unless otherwise noted – are available as in-school presentations from Nov. 7-11:

  • Bob’s Tour: See description under Nov. 8. Depending on the date requested, the director may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Concerned Student 1950 (Adam Dietrich, Varun Bajaj & Kellan Marvin, U.S., 2016, 32 min., documentary short): A series of racist acts prompts three University of Missouri students to pick up cameras and take us inside Concerned Student 1950, the student movement whose peaceful protest brought down the college president. Depending on the date requested, the directors may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Frans Lanting: The Evolution of Life (Steven Kochones, U.S., 2015, 23 min., documentary short): A dazzling journey through time via the remarkable images of National Geographic photographer Frans Lanting and his epic “LIFE” project, which presents a stunning interpretation of life on Earth, from the Big Bang through the present. Appropriate for grades 4-12

  • Gentlemen of Vision: See description under Nov. 7. Depending on the date requested, the director may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12

  • The Head of Joaquin Murrieta (John J. Valadez, U.S., 2015, 30 min., documentary short): A filmmaker embarks on a quixotic cross-country road trip to bury the fabled head of Joaquin Murrieta while learning about the history of racism and violence directed at Mexicans in the American West. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • I, Destini (Nicholas Pilarski & Destini Riley, U.S., 2016, 14 min., documentary short): An animated documentary that explores the poignant and imaginative illustrations of a youth grappling with the effects of having an incarcerated loved one. Appropriate for grades 4-12

  • The Leprechaun's Wife (Alexandra Shiva, U.S., 2016, 21 min., documentary short): A portrait of an extraordinary woman, wife, and mother living on the autism spectrum. Appropriate for grades 6-12

  • Lives Restarted (Waheed AlQawasmi, U.S., 2016, 39 min., documentary short): After being liberated from concentration camps, U.S.-bound Holocaust survivors restart their lives with only the clothes on the their backs. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Living Like Kings (Benjamin Kaplan, U.S., 2014, 29 min., documentary short): An exploration of race, class, culture, and personal expression through the unexpected collision of chess and hip-hop. Depending on the date requested, the directors may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 6-12

  • Profiling Race: Mike Higgins (Matthew Seilback, U.S., 2016, 35 min., documentary short): An exploration of Mike Higgins’ childhood in St. Louis, service in the Army, mission as a pastor, and work in the Black Lives Matter movement. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Refuge (Matt. K Firpo, Greece; U.S., 2016, 20 min., documentary short): Human stories from the European refugee crisis, focused on humanity and hope. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • She Started It: See description under Nov. 8. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Show Me Democracy: See description under Nov. 9. Depending on the date requested, the director may be available to accompany in-school screenings for Q&As; inquire about availability. Appropriate for grades 9-12

  • Soul City (Monica Berra, SheRea DelSol & Gini Richards, U.S., 2016, 20 min., documentary short): The story of a group of civil-rights activists and city slickers who attempt to build a multiracial utopia in North Carolina in the 1970s. Appropriate for grades 9-12

For all in-school presentations, schools will need to be able to screen the films from DVDs, preferably with a digital projector.